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nubianbrothaz:

blackonpalestine:

#DetroitGazasolidarity #DetroitPalestineSolidarity #Palestine
(Shared on fb by Antonio Rafael)
Jul 23, 2014 / 841 notes

nubianbrothaz:

blackonpalestine:

#DetroitGazasolidarity #DetroitPalestineSolidarity #Palestine

(Shared on fb by Antonio Rafael)

  NubianBrothaz.tumblr.com

There’s something about being oppressed that makes the oppressed seek the power of the oppressor- Dr. Randal Bailey
Tonight I sat in a class at the ITC (interdenominational theological center) called “the bible, sex, and sexuality” being instructed by Dr. Randal Bailey, one of the most impressive minds I’ve ever encountered. Part of what Dr. Bailey does is shine light on the obvious sexual nature of the biblical text that we have been TRAINED to over look. It’s not always pretty or entertaining, as this is a text from an era where women were property and men had free reign over their bodies. One of the prevailing themes of the class this semester was “Queer Theory”, or reading the bible from a non hetero normative manner. While it seems that this would work in favor of the LGBTQ community, it too can be a gruesome reminder of the atrocities of humanity. The same way men had free reign over women’s bodies, they took the same domineering privileges over other men. It proves the irrefutable existence of same sex relations in biblical text, but can offer no healthy model of these relations to its reader. Now that I’ve set all that up, let me get to the quote ——» Dr. Bailey describes to us the events of a radio show he listened to that irritated him to say the least. It was a talk show on a black radio station (ITC is an HBCU seminary, so everything is set within the context of the black community) and the topic of discussion happened to be same sex marriage. Dr. Bailey described the disgust he felt as he listened to countless African-Americans call and proclaim their disdain for the gay community and their desire to deny access to the same marital privileges and rights that they enjoy. Without a flinch in his eye or hesitation in his voice he made the statement, “There’s something about being oppressed that makes the oppressed seek the power of the oppressor”. I literally had to grab the table in front of me, as the power and conviction of this statement knocked me off balance. Before I could fully regain my balance he further pushed the statement along this wise: “it seems as though black people waited for the day that we would seize the power of our oppressor; while we never fully possessed that power, we took what we could get and found another group of people to marginalize”. I paraphrased a bit as I’ve lost some of his words in the rest of my night’s transactions. But this really made me look deep into our culture to find the root of this hatred. I’m going to make the bold statement that it is not a result of faith. It is not the result of the Christian faith or reading the bible. While most black Christians will never admit it, the truth is THEY DO NOT ACTUALLY BELIEVE THE BIBLE ENTIRELY. No, they do not take every word to be true. How do I know? Black people eat too much seafood and get divorced too much. People try to down play these details, but the consumption of seafood is apart of the same levitical law as the “homosexual ban”. And Jesus gave clear instructions AGAINST divorce. Yet we partake. But we deny the literal meaning that we put on scriptures that “speak against” same sex love. So where do we get the nerve to be the oppressor to people who’ve already been oppressed? Who authorized black people to seek to deny someone else rights, when our past deprivation of these same rights isn’t too far into history? What’s the root of this internal oppression? Is it human nature? Human psychology? We were taught that the puritans/pilgrims allegedly sought refuge in the new land for religious freedom, and once in power imposed the same the religious restrictions on other citizens. Could it be that humans are incapable of managing authority? Is it black consciousness and psychology? I would sooner hear the argument of a black person who cites the history of slave owners dressing black boys in women’s clothing and making them perform households duties as the reasons for black peoples adverse attitudes towards same gender relations or anything the “feminized the Black male” (as most of the heated arguing is centered around male/male love, not female to female) I still don’t accept or embrace it, as this argument leaves a large area of gray; it doesn’t account for men who are “masculine” and happily gay or bisexual, and it doesn’t account for men who are less “masculine” but are happily heterosexual. And even more of a reason for me to deny this argument is that our anger is still pointed inward, while the oppressor stands and watches us tear each other apart. But I’ll hear the argument because it at least has some reference point to consider. If most black people would tell the truth, both black woman and black man would all say the thing: it’s all about power. Which still stems from hetero normative ideals, but it would be unanimously about power. I’ll prove it. I’m gay and my best friend is straight. We’ve been friends since we were 13, so we grew up and came into ourselves together. He always accepted and respected the fact that I’m gay, but in our early years there was one question that stood out: “just tell me your NOT the guy being penetrated”. And I’ve heard this question/statement from countless others. You see, in heteronormativity the ability to penetrate another person sexually represents power, dominance, and value, and that sexual power automatically goes to a man. (Which shows how hetero normativity views women. LESSOR.) This hetero normative power play is thrown off in male to male sexual relations, as one man has to “lower” himself or place himself in the “female” role, or as often asked “who’s the man and who’s the woman?” While the power play is never mentioned, it’s implied within this question. (Which is why I don’t understand women who ask this. Do you not hear what you’re really asking? You’re acknowledging and embracing your inferiority to a man) And what’s even more unfortunate, a large majority of the gay community accept these ideals in our own community, as we hold a more derogatory view of men who identify as “bottom” rather than “top”. We assign gender roles within a same gender context. The bottom line is it seems that we have a power complex, especially in relation to our black men. We struggled for freedom and power and somehow applied this struggle and even what ever sense of power we were given to our sexualities. Anyone who deviates from the plan or throws the black male power balance off is subject to social oppression dressed in religious garments. We make people feel that they are unnatural and therefore useless. We force people out of their true natures, creating robots and monsters incapable of true love and productivity. We rob people of true life. Lock them in closets. Bury them in unmarked graves. We hold them hostage in the one place they should be free. Lets unlock the door. Free your sister and brother. Free your uncle and aunt. Free the generations that will come behind us. Now this is my interpretation of the issue. I hold it to be true. You may not see it the way I do, and that’s fine, but don’t shoot it down before fully considering my words. (via blackvoiceroyals)

(via relleeworld)

Jul 22, 2014 / 18 notes
Jul 22, 2014 / 650 notes

(via jays-anatomy)

Jul 22, 2014 / 15,049 notes

blackgirlwhiteboylove:

sancophaleague:

We have to be the biggest promoters of our own stories.  Can’t  depend on CNN to promote inspiring black stories. Just wanted to share this story.

“Graduating from university is normally an occasion for a family get-together.
And this was certainly a big celebration for the Ogunsanya quadruplets who were handed their well-deserved degrees from the same university on the same day.

The 23-year-old quads, identical sisters and the oldest by four minutes, Toks and Temi Ogunsanya, and identical brothers, Tobi and Tolu, graduated from Warwick University with Master Degrees.



And there was not a jot of sibling rivalry as all four have landed jobs in the City already.

Toks graduated with anMEng in manufacturing and engineering and Temi, Tobi and Tolu all gained an MSC in management from Warwick Business School.

‘The fact we all chose to study at the University of Warwick was a natural decision,’ says Tobi, who thinks a bit of sibling rivalry is essential for success.

‘We are a close-knit family and were all attracted by the strength of the courses on offer.

‘We all gravitated to similar courses because we’ve always been interested in business and management and our father is a successful businessman in Nigeria.’



The quads, originally from Lagos, Nigeria, have been living in the UK since the age of seven when they began boarding schools. Since leaving university they have all landed top city jobs.

Toks is due to start working for RBS in London later this year, Temi, who interned at Santander over the summer, has been offered a permanent position with the bank, and Tolu is due to start working for one of the ‘Big 4’ accountancy firms in the City.

‘Our parents are four times as proud of us,’ added Tobi, who is mulling over two offers from two major City firms.

‘They’ve supported us financially and have encouraged us all the way - without their help we wouldn’t be here today.’ “

Source (DailyMail.com/UKnews)



Post Made By @solar_innerg

#sancophaleague 

Black excellence

(via thebrowncrown)

Jul 22, 2014 / 2,926 notes

m7madsmiry:

A channel that manipulates the truth and seems to support the oppressive is not a channel, it’s garbage. Even garbage is more useful, at least the sh*t it contains is real !!!!!

(via thebrowncrown)

Jul 22, 2014 / 17,887 notes

takeprideinyourheritage:

sochiximbashful:

cudrage:

Katt Williams on Dave Chappelle: “But Dave Chappelle was decapitated in front of us. And until we deal that. Until we deal with the fact that a devout Muslim was accused of being a crackhead. And until we establish the fact that they said he went to Africa to smoke cocaine when we know they don’t have running water and food over there. When they don’t have paved roads over there. You saying he flew past Chicago and Miami and LA and New York and Detroit, you saying he went past Cleveland and Fort Pierce, Florida, and he went past Okeechobee and Oakland, you saying he went all the way to another country where they not eating? You talking about somebody who has a wife and children, five children, and lives on a farm, he doesn’t live here in Hollywood. You saying you convince people that person was an insane crackhead? And he hasn’t been on movies and TV for eight years is that correct? Ok then don’t tell me about what you wanna tell me, I just watched you decapitate him in front of me… Then when he made 500 million dollars, even though his contract said he was supposed to get half of it, they said he made too much for the contract to be valid, so we’ll offer you 10% of what you made. You mean he made 500 million and they offered him 50? Yes. And he said, “what do you think my fans are gonna say? When they find out you offered me 10% of what I made you.” And they said, “your fans will believe that you’re a crazy crackhead by the time you get home. And my nigga got on a flight in LA and by the time he got to Ohio it was so. And eight years later he hasn’t been in a movie or television and is just now trying to do his real comeback in Radio City Music Hall. It’s bees like that sometimes.”

Wow. I didn’t know Dave Chappelle was Muslim 😃

Wow

i never thought or believed he was a crackhead. I thought he just had a break down after the whole situation and wanted to be away from the media.

(via thebrowncrown)

Jul 22, 2014 / 35,124 notes

futuremrsknow-it-all:

Omarosa Manigault on Bethenny Frankel show.

Reblog, every single time.

(via thott-city)

Jul 22, 2014 / 223,090 notes

(via thoughtmd)


“Why should they ask me to put on a uniform and go 10,000 miles from home and drop bombs and bullets on Brown people in Vietnam while so-called Negro people in Louisville are treated like dogs and denied simple human rights? No I’m not going 10,000 miles from home to help murder and burn another poor nation simply to continue the domination of white slave masters over darker people in the world. This is the day when such evils must come to an end. I have been warned that to take such a stand would cost me millions of dollars. But I have said it once and I will say it again. The real enemy of my people is here. I will not disgrace my religion, my people or myself by becoming a tool to enslave those who are fighting for their own justice, freedom and equality. If I thought the war was going to bring freedom and equality to 22 million of my people they wouldn’t have to draft me, I’d join tomorrow. I have nothing to lose by standing up for my beliefs. So I’ll go to jail, so what? We’ve been in jail for 400 years.” - 1967 (Muhammad Ali)
Jul 22, 2014 / 23,230 notes

“Why should they ask me to put on a uniform and go 10,000 miles from home and drop bombs and bullets on Brown people in Vietnam while so-called Negro people in Louisville are treated like dogs and denied simple human rights? No I’m not going 10,000 miles from home to help murder and burn another poor nation simply to continue the domination of white slave masters over darker people in the world. This is the day when such evils must come to an end. I have been warned that to take such a stand would cost me millions of dollars. But I have said it once and I will say it again. The real enemy of my people is here. I will not disgrace my religion, my people or myself by becoming a tool to enslave those who are fighting for their own justice, freedom and equality. If I thought the war was going to bring freedom and equality to 22 million of my people they wouldn’t have to draft me, I’d join tomorrow. I have nothing to lose by standing up for my beliefs. So I’ll go to jail, so what? We’ve been in jail for 400 years.” - 1967 (Muhammad Ali)

(via selfloathing--narcissist)

kushandwizdom:

Good Vibes here
Jul 22, 2014 / 13,723 notes

kushandwizdom:

Good Vibes here

(via southernlion)